Tag Archives: #WDTBD

Test Your Smartphone Smarts #3

Here is the third in our series of Review Questions from our “What Does This Button Do?” show.  These can’t be graded, but if you want to see the discussion of our answers to these questions, you can click the link provided. The link will take you to the time in the specific episode where we start the discussion of review questions. Since we have produced 68 episodes so far, this “Test Your Smartphone Smarts” will be an ongoing series of posts here.

Click here to watch our answers
Episode #9: Camera Basics Show Notes

  • How do you get an iPhone/iPad to take a video?
  • How do you turn on or off the setting for geotagging your photos?
32:50:00
Episode #10: Google Calendar Show Notes

  • How do you use Google Calendar on an iPhone or iPad when there is no App available?
  • True or False: Using Google calendar 2 or more people can add and edit events to the same calendar
35:37
Episode #11: Siri and Google Now Show Notes

  • How do you start Siri on iPhone/iPad?
  • How do you start Google Now on an Android device?
23:59
Episode #12: If phone is lost or stolen Show Notes

  • Where do you find the Apple setting to turn on “Find my iPhone”
  • If your iPad or iPhone is missing, what website do you use to find it?
  • Where do you find the Android setting to turn on the locator service?
30:33

If you click the time link, you will be viewing the YouTube video for that episode. The link takes you directly to the end of the show where we discuss the review questions. You can always drag the video playhead to the beginning to watch more of that episode. And, if you are a premium member of Geeks On Tour, you have access to the show notes for each episode. You will find all show notes on the Weekly Show page. So, how did you do on the questions? Leave any comments below! See previous “Smartphone Smarts”

 

To enjoy full access to the Geeks On Tour Library of “How To” Videos and the Weekly Show Notes sign-up for a membership today!

Test Your Smartphone Smarts #2

Here is the second in our series of Review Questions from our “What Does This Button Do?” show.  These are not mulitple choice, and many have more than one right answer so this is not a test that can be graded like a college entrance exam, but if you want to see the discussion of our answers to these questions, you can click the link provided. The link will take you to the time in the specific episode where we start the discussion of review questions. Since we have produced 68 episodes so far, this “Test Your Smartphone Smarts” will be an ongoing series of posts here.

 

Click here to watch our answers
Episode #5: Synchronizing Email Show Notes

  • When you delete an email from your phone or tablet, is that email deleted when you view your inbox on the computer?
  • In order to set up your email system like the Geeks, you need to download and use what App? __________________________
37:29:00
Episode #6: Go Back Show Notes

  • To back up a step while using your iPad or iPhone, look for a left pointing arrow in what corner of your screen?
  • If the Back button is never visible on your Android, check the settings for “Touch Key Light duration” under the _____________________ menu.
40:10:00
Episode #7: Onscreen Keyboard Show Notes

  • How do you make a keyboard appear on the screen? (same for Apple or Android)
  • How do you make the onscreen keyboard disappear? (different for Apple and Android
  • How do you dictate a written message? (same on Apple and Android)
35:17:00
Episode #8: Wi-Fi Show Notes

  • What are the two ways to connect a smartphone to the Internet?
  • If your phone is connected to Wi-Fi will it use cellular data?
32:22:00

If you click the time link, you will be viewing the YouTube video for that episode. The link takes you directly to the end of the show where we discuss the review questions. You can always drag the video play-head to the beginning to watch more of that episode. And, if you are a premium member of Geeks On Tour, you have access to the show notes for each episode. You will find all show notes on the Weekly Show page. So, how did you do on the questions? Leave any comments below!

See previous “Smartphone Smarts”

 

To enjoy full access to the Geeks On Tour Library of “How To” Videos and the Weekly Show Notes sign-up for a membership today!

Test Your Smartphone Smarts #1

For the last year and a half we’ve been presenting a weekly lesson on smartphones and tablets. It’s a webcast show on Youtube we call “What Does This Button Do?” At the end of each show we have review questions. Whether you’ve watched the show or not, we thought you might like to test your smartphone smarts by seeing if you can answer some review questions. These are not mulitple choice, and many have more than one right answer so this is not a test that can be graded like a college entrance exam, but if you want to see the discussion of our answers to these questions, you can click the link provided. The link will take you to the time in the specific episode where we start the discussion of review questions. Since we have produced more than 80 episodes so far, this “Test Your Smartphone Smarts” will be an ongoing series of posts here.

Click here to watch our answers
Episode #1: Home Button  Show Notes

  • What button, besides the power button, can wake up a sleeping smartphone?
  • What does Longpress mean?
 

30:22:00

Episode #2: Settings for Sleep/Lock  Show Notes

  • Why do we need the screen to turn off on its own?
  • How can you control the length of inactivity before the screen turns off?
  • Why do we need passcodes on the Lock screen?
35:27:00
Episode #3: Multi-Tasking  Show Notes

  • We call it “Multi-Tasking” – technically, it is just a list of  ________________
  • True or False? Apps on your recently used list are taking up valuable memory and processing resources.
 

26:28:00

Episode #4: Organizing Home Screens Show Notes

  • If you delete an App from your home screen on an Android device, have you uninstalled the App? Yes/No?
  • If you delete an App from your home screen on an Apple device, have you uninstalled the App? Yes/No?
  • To save space on your home screen, you can put multiple Apps into one _________________
33:55:00

If you click the time link, you will be viewing the YouTube video for that episode. The link takes you directly to the end of the show where we discuss the review questions. You can always drag the video playhead to the beginning to watch more of that episode. And, if you are a premium member of Geeks On Tour, you have access to the show notes for each episode. You will find them on the Weekly Show page.

So, how did you do on the questions? Leave any comments below!

 

To enjoy full access to the Geeks On Tour Library of “How To” Videos and the Weekly Show Notes sign-up for a membership today!

How do you Learn Smartphone Basics?

LearningI know that some people got a brand new shiny smartphone over the holidays. If it is your very first smartphone, where do you start? With everyone around you using their phones constantly you figure you can just ask for help, right? But they grab your phone, tap here, drag there and give it back to you. You still don’t know what to do, but you don’t want to look too stupid, and you don’t want to bother them anymore – they have texting and posting to do! Read on, this article is for you.

What Kind of Phone did you Get?

There are two main types of smartphones – iPhone and Android –  and your instructions will differ depending on the type you have. With tablets, there are the same two types and the instructions are basically the same. So what is yours? All you have to do is hold it upright and look at the bottom. If you see a round button, you have an iPhone. It will also have an Apple logo on the back.  If you don’t have a round button, it’s probably an Android. The third option is a Windows Phone, you will see a Winodws logo image  – very few people have those and we don’t cover the specific instructions.

Round ‘Home’ button Not Round ‘Home’ button No real button at all, just an icon for ‘Home’ button

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iPhone

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Android by Samsung

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Android

There is a LOT to know about these devices because they do so much, we livecast a weekly, 40 minute Youtube show on using Smartphones and Tablets. We’ve recorded 66 episodes and we’re just getting started! Episode 66 is on this topic: Learning the Basics, just click to watch the show on Youtube.

Before you can go too far with using any given function on your phone, we think there are some basics about using the device that will get you started. If this were a car, we’re talking about knowing how to lock and unlock the door, start the ignition, use the accelerator, brakes, and gearshift, and how much to move the wheel to accomplish your turns. Only then can you start learning about getting to your destinations.

Is It On? On/Off, Sleep/Wake, Lock

If your phone is on and you press the power button, it appears to turn off, but its not. It’s just asleep. The screen is off, but the phone is still on. You should never leave the screen on when you’re not actively using your phone, it drains the battery faster than anything else. When the screen is off and you press the power button, the screen comes on – it wakes up – but it may be ‘locked.’ The ‘Lock’ screen is what is shown until you swipe the screen to get to your Home screen – the one with all the icons. If you have security turned on, and you should, then you need to enter a passcode, or use your fingerprint, or some other procedure to unlock it. This is so someone who steals your phone can’t get in and see your stuff.

To turn the phone off, powered off, you hold down on the power button until a message appears on the screen, follow the instructions on the message. How do you know it’s off? If you give a short press on the power button and the screen doesn’t come on – then the phone is powered off. To turn it on, you need to hold down on that power button (aka the Sleep/Wake button) until you see something happen on the screen. Usually, you will first see a logo then it takes a minute to come fully to life.

Speaking of turning it off and on reminds me of our friend Abby Stokes’ book, Is This Thing On? She calls it A Friendly Guide to Everything Digital for Newbies, Technophobes, and the Kicking & Screaming. Check it out on her website, AskAbbyStokes.com.

 

How to use the touchscreen: tap, double-tap, longpress, drag, pinch, zoom

These are very touchy devices. You need to get some practice in learning how your particular device likes to be touched. If you find a game you like to play on it, that is a good way to get practice. If tapping an icon doesn’t seem to work, do not tap it harder! You may be issuing another command entirely, called a longpress. That is when you touch and hold on a spot and something is programmed to happen. On an iPhone, if you touch and hold on an icon on a home screen, you will see all the icons start to wiggle. That means they are ready to move. You can drag one to another spot, you can even drag one on top of another and they will combine into a folder. When you’re done, you press the home button (the round one, remember?) to stop the wiggling.

If you have a mapping program (App) open, a longpress does something quite different – it drops a marker on the map. With the map, you can use two fingers on the screen, pinch them together, and the map gets smaller, zooming out to show you more. With the same two fingers on the screen, if you spread them (reverse pinch?) you will zoom in to a closer look at the map. Double-tap does the same thing – zooms in. One finger on the screen, dragging around, moves the map to a different location. If you’re viewing a photo, double-tap will zoom you in, enlarging the photo. Another double-tap will zoom you back out to the original size. The point is to try these ‘gestures’ they’ll do something different in each application, but they’ll almost always do something – and you’ll learn.

Navigating the device: Home button, Back button, multitasking button, Search, Notifications

Tapping an icon opens that App, then tapping something within the app takes you somewhere within the App. If you want to get back to your phone’s starting place, that’s called Home, and guess what?! The Home button will take you there so you can start over with something else.

On Android devices there is a dedicated ‘Back’ button. It is represented by some kind of arrow, and it is beside the Home button. If you don’t see it, tap anyway, it may light up. So, if you tapped an App, let’s call that ‘level 1’, then you tap a button within an App to get to ‘level 2,’ and then another to ‘level 3.’ If you now tap the Back button, you’ll get to level 2, tap Back again to level 1, tap Back again and you’re back to the Home screen where you first found the icon for the App. The Back button is great for backing up one or two steps, but remember the Home button to get you all the way back to the starting point. iPhones do not have a Back button, but most Apps will show an arrow at the upper left corner to back up one step.

Let’s say you opened a map App to look up a location. You pinched and zoomed and dragged to get in the vicinity, but then you couldn’t remember the name of the city. That information is in an email. So, you tap your Home button to go home, swipe thru your Home screens to find your Email App, open it up and find the email with the information. Now you want to get back to the map. You could tap Home again, find the icon for the Map App and tap it, but since you were just there, the Map is called a “Recently Used App” and there’s a button for that! It’s called Recent Apps. On an iPhone you get to Recent Apps by double-tapping on the Home button. You should now see a screen with a representation of all your recently used Apps with the most recent at the bottom. Tap the Maps App from there and your right back where you were. Now you need the address from the email? No problem. Go to Recent Apps (double tap on Home) and Email will be right there.

On Android, the Recent Apps button can be very different from phone to phone. On my Samsung Galaxy S5 it’s to the left of my Home button and it looks like two overlapping squares. On my older Motorola phone, there is no dedicated Recent Apps button, I need to longpress on the Home button. This function is also referred to as Multitasking. The Recent Apps view is also how you close an App – you swipe it off the screen.

Did you Learn Something?

REVIEW Questions: we end every show with Review Questions. Here are the questions for Episode 66 on Learning the Basics. You can watch the video where we answer these questions.

1.The power button is also known as the Sleep/Wake button. What other button can Wake a sleeping phone?

2.What do you do with the power button to turn the phone OFF?

3.T/F: if tapping an icon doesn’t work, you should press harder

4.If you’re on a call and you need to look at your calendar, what do you do?

5.If you don’t see an App, yet you know it’s on your phone, what can you do?

6.If you don’t have a dedicated Back button (like on iPhone) where do you look for an onscreen Back button?

Keep on Learning!

1-wdtbd

 

The first several episodes of What Does This Button Do? were all on the basics. Spend some time to watch and review:

Show Notes with Timeline Links to Video
(requires premium membership)
Free YouTube Videos of complete Episodes
#1 Home Button#2 Sleep/Lock

#3 MultiTasking/Recent Apps

#4 Organizing Home Screens

#5 Synchronizing Email

#6 the Back Button

#7 Onscreen Keyboard

#8 Connecting to WiFi

#1 Home Button#2 Sleep/Lock

#3 MultiTaskgin/Recent Apps

#4 Organizing Home Screens

#5 Synchronizing Email

#6 the Back Button

#7 Onscreen Keyboard

#8 Connecting to WiF

 

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Google Maps and Offline Navigation

imageI recently heard about a new way to download Google Maps so they are accessible offline. I’ve used offline Google Maps before, but we couldn’t search or navigate. It’s search and navigate that makes Google Maps so useful! Now, I’m reading that maps saved offline can be used for search and navigation. Hooray! So, I immediately opened my Google Maps to try it. It didn’t work. I couldn’t find the “Download” button anywhere and that is what the instructions told me to use.

Update Google Maps to get Offline Navigation

Ooops, I hadn’t yet updated my Google Maps app to the latest release. Once I did that, the offline map feature was available. To do the update, you go to the Play store on an Android device, tap Menu, then My Apps. Any apps that have an update waiting will be listed at the top. Tap the App, then tap Update, then OK to accept necessary permissions.

Our last trip where we were often offline was the UK. So I tried searching for London, UK –> tap on London, UK at the bottom of the screen, the next screen shows a “Download” button and an outline of the size of the map section that I can download. I can get all of London, but not all of England in the downloaded map. It’s a large download, you need to use free Wi-Fi or at least be aware of the data that will be used. While you have the blue outline on the screen you can expand and adjust the part of the map that is being saved. Notice there is also info on how large the download will be. For Colorado, I can get the whole state from East to West, as a slice along I70. That download will be 1.5 GB. If I just capture the Denver area, it’s 500 MB.

So then, I searched for Havana, Cuba because that is where our next trip is! No Download button appeared. Ok, what did I do wrong this time? A little more research and I found the small print, “Downloading offline areas isn’t available in some regions because of contractual limitations, language support, address formats, or other reasons.” Darn! Cuba must be one of those areas.
But, next time we find ourselves exploring roads thru the Rocky mountains, you can bet we’ll download the offline map and we will have Google Maps Search and Navigation available even when we don’t have a data connection.

iPhone and iPad Google Map Features “coming soon”

The ability to search and navigate offline is first rolling out to the Android version, the iOS version has been announced, but is not yet available.

Want to Learn More?

Episode #14: Doing Updates

wdtbdad

Episode #26: Google Maps

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Cellular Internet Connections: It’s Not Just the Signal, it’s the Speed

Where most people look for pretty trees at the campground, we look for pretty cell towers!

by Chris Guld www.GeeksOnTour.com

We travel all over the country in our Motorhome and we depend on our website, GeeksOnTour.com, for our living. Internet connections are very important to us and we rely on Verizon thru our Android phones to provide that connection. We also live-stream a smartphone educational show every week. It’s called What Does This Button Do? and we do it from our motorhome. In case you are not aware, “Streaming” and “Internet Hog” are synonymous!

I have to be reminded that some people use their phones to make phone calls! Just to be clear, we’re only talking about Internet … Data … connections in this article. Voice is a different topic which may or may not be affected by the same factors.

Most people judge their cellular Internet connection by simply looking at the signal bars on their phone. 1-2 bars = bad; 4-5 bars = good. But that’s not always true.

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Using Ookla Speed Test App

Signal strength is only one measurement, and in my opinion it is not the most important one. We have been in places where we were seeing only 1-2 bars, yet our Internet performance – the speed – was very good. We have also seen 4-5 bars and had low speed. We use the Ookla Speed Test app to check our speeds. We’ve seen download speeds ranging from .2 Mbps to 74. But, those numbers don’t always correlate with the signal strength.

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In the image above you can see that the signal strength is not that great, yet the speed is VERY good! And, we’ve seen the results go the opposite way as well; where the signal strength has been registering 5 bars, yet the speed is <1Mbps.

When we pull into an RV park now, we drive around with our cell phones out and Ookla Speed test running. At each possible site, we’ll do a speed test. We were recently at the Thousand Trails park in Hershey, PA and we planned to be there for #48 of our What Does This Button Do?, so we really needed good Internet. When we pulled into the park, our signal strength was registering only 2 bars … of 3G. Not good. There were some areas where we saw no signal at all. Then we found one area with 2 bars of 4G, so we started an Ookla speed test and saw less than 1Mbps of speed. We thought we would need to leave and find another park, but we kept looking at other sites and doing speed tests. We found one, where Ookla registered 2-3 Mbps both up and down, so we parked. Surprisingly, we were able to do our show just fine.

Not all Cell Towers are Equal

Realize that the signal strength bars are simply measuring how strong the signal connection is between your device and the nearest cell tower for your service provider. So, there may be times when you are very close and have good signal strength, but it’s an old tower with outdated equipment. A better connection doesn’t help if what you’re connecting to isn’t any good. And vice versa – you may have a weak connection but if the cell tower you are connecting to has the latest and greatest technology, you may still get good results. Realize that “Old” and “Outdated” may be measured in months!

imageCellular technology is very fast-moving. If you want to learn more about this, we recommend the excellent book: RV Mobile Internet Handbook by Chris Dunphy and Cherie Ve Ard of Technomadia. You can find the book and much more on their website RVMobileInternet.com.

The Numbers Don’t Tell the Whole Story

You can’t just look at the numbers and know how good your Internet connection is. I thought we would be unable to do our streaming show from the Hershey campground based on the numbers, but it went just fine. There are so many factors in this complex technology.  It’s your experience that counts. Browse to a website; did it load fast or are you still waiting? Try to play a YouTube video; does it start right away and continue straight thru or does it stop ever few seconds to buffer?  Try uploading a video; does it complete or does it die halfway through? If you’re not getting the results you want, there are signal boosters that will help, but only IF the problem is signal strength. If the problem is cell tower equipment quality, you may need to move!

Evernote Can Receive your Email

imageIf you haven’t heard of Evernote, do yourself a favor and watch our “What Does This Button Do?” show, episode #54. We give an introduction to Evernote starting at 06:49 into the show. Evernote is our Go To place to enter any kind of information we want to keep, remember, find later. That includes a simple note about something you just heard, a snapshot of an eye exam and prescription, a copy of a webpage you want to read later, a snapshot of a receipt, and many many more.

Your Evernote Email Address

When you have an Evernote account, you can create notes by opening Evernote on your computer or on your smartphone or tablet. This article is about the fact that your Evernote account comes with a special email address. Email something to that address and it gets filed in your Evernote account. I use this to save important emails out of my inbox. So, for example, if I receive an email with important information about documents my accountant needs for my taxes, I might forward that email to my Evernote account. I do the same with any and all documents important to my taxes and then, when it comes time to prepare them – all I need is access to my Evernote account. If I have the opportunity to edit the subject line of the forwarding email, I can add @taxes to automatically file it in the “Taxes” notebook in Evernote.

During our streaming Evernote lesson, a viewer – Marie MacDonald –  left a comment about how she uses her Evernote email address as a way to subscribe to newsletters! What a GREAT idea! That bypasses your email inbox completely. Whatever arrives in Evernote via email is stored in your default notebook, but you can set up a Notebook for newsletters and move notes there later.

To find your special Evernote email address just go to the menu and choose Settings and Account Info. You will see an entry for Evernote Email and it will look something like yourname.74363h2@m.evernote.com. Anything sent to that email will show up in your default notebook in Evernote. You can move them later.

The video above comes directly from Evernote and it also shows how, using Gmail, you could make a rule to automatically forward messages to your Evernote account.

As an Evernote Basic (Free) customer, can I save emails into Evernote?

Saving emails into Evernote became a paid feature on July 15, 2015. Evernote Basic customers can try this feature by saving up to five emails into Evernote before upgrading to Evernote Plus or Premium. For more info on features and pricing see the Evernote Pricing Page.

Start Using Evernote

If you don’t already have Evernote, you can set up a free account by using this LINK – Geeks on Tour will get points and you will get one month free trial of Evernote Premium.

These Geeks are On Tour!

In case you’ve wondered what’s the deal with Geeks on Tour. What do they do? Why do they say they’re ‘On Tour?’ Let me give you an example of a week in our life …

We get booked to present seminars at RV Rallies, RV Parks, Computer Clubs, Senior Centers, and even people’s homes as we travel around the country in our Motorhome.

We were scheduled for one such seminar at the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute in Fairfax, Virginia on Saturday, September 12. This is in the Washington D.C. area so we arrived a couple of days early and parked our RV at Cherry Hill RV park, taking advantage of several buses that stop right at the RV park and take you in for sightseeing in D.C.

On Saturday morning, we left the RV park in order to get to Fairfax and do our Google Photos seminar for a joint computer club meeting at 1pm. They did a nice job of promoting us:

Picasa Content

They had a large parking area marked off for us to use:

 

It was a good group – we thought the seminar went quite well. It was also live streamed over the Internet using something called Zoom. If we get a link to a recording, we’ll post it here. And here’s some comments we got afterward:

 

We really got a lot out of your presentation.  I intend to use Picasa and Google Photos.  The others, iPhotos, Aperture and Apple Photos didn’t stir up my interest enough to really put the time into learning them.

 Today’s presenters were terrific!  Both my wife and I found their presentation to be extremely helpful and very current.  Jim and Chris could not have been any better!

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We left Fairfax about 4:30 headed to our next stop in Raleigh, N.C. to do our weekly streaming show, “What Does This Button Do?” We were scheduled to do this week’s show at the home studio of Martin Brossman about 270 miles away. We just needed to get on down the road, so we stayed in a Walmart parking lot that night, got our grocery shopping done, and made it to Martin’s by 11am on Sunday. He has a nice big driveway!
This is a live show … aka STRESSFUL! You have to wait until showtime to click the button that reads “go live” and, guess what! The button simply wasn’t there! This was our 52d show and we’d never had this problem before. Jim had to quick set up an entirely new show stream. But, he did it! And Martin was great for rolling with the punches. We got started about 12 minutes late, but continued on with a successful show. The topic was the Amazon Echo and Martin runs a community on Google Plus about it.

Click the picture above to watch the whole whole show (we cut out the first 10 minutes!) You can see all of our shows by viewing the Youtube Playlist for What Does This Button Do?

After the show, we went out for dinner and had a GREAT time with Martin. We are definitely “Geeks-of-a-Feather.” He shared with us his expertise on Social Media for Business – and gave us a copy of his book. We shared with him our expertise on Google Photos and gave him our library-on-a-drive of all our videos and eBooks.

Then we got back on the road again sometime after 5. We really don’t like to drive at night, and had no place we needed to be for a couple of days, so after a couple hours, we just found a rest area and pulled off. We cranked up the generator for power, threw something in the microwave for dinner, read emails for a while, and went to bed.

Home for the night – 9/13/15

Next stop, Hilton Head, where we are booked for several events. First off, a sold out hands-on class teaching people about using their smartphone cameras.


Then, a presentation for the Hilton Head Island Computer Club (click the image to view their website):

And, then 2 more presentations for the Sun City Hilton Head Computer Club.

We taught 2 1.5 hour seminars, one that is an overview of Google Photos, and another that was an open Q&A about all things smartphone and tablets. We were told that they wanted us to come back any time it was possible – they would arrange their schedule for us!

Over this one week period we gained 31 new premium members and several dozen newsletter subscribers. Thus is the life of the Geeks on Tour!

Further your computer education**Subscribe to the Free Geeks on Tour Newsletters**

Watch our Weekly Online Show on Learning Smartphones and Tablets!

Geeks on Tour Member Benefit: Show Notes

Geeks on Tour is member supported! We don’t take advertising and we don’t sell any product other than our own teaching. This newsletter is free for all, and our weekly “What Does This Button Do?” show is free on Youtube. So what do you get when you sign up for a Premium Membership?

  1. Access to all (over 400) of our Tutorial Videos
  2. Ask the Geeks any question in our Q&A Forum
  3. Show Notes for the “What Does This Button Do?” Shows

We Use the Show Notes Ourselves

Just like the owner of the “Hair Club for Men” Smile – we think it shows the value of our Show Notes when we use them ourselves! Here’s what happened:

I was using my Android smartphone and I was looking at the complete list of tutorial videos on the GeeksonTour.com website. Someone had asked for a link to the video about migrating from iPhoto to Picasa and I wanted to get the specific link to our video on that topic. If I was using a computer, I could go to our page where all the videos are listed and use the CTRL-F command to “Find” any text on that particular page. I could type iPhoto and find that video. But, I was using a smartphone, there is no way to do a CTRL-F on a smartphone. I remembered that we had done one of our weekly “What Does This Button Do?” shows on using web-browsers on smartphones, and we even covered how to search within a page using that browser. But, I didn’t remember how to do it!

First I needed to find which of our shows (we’re up to #47 now) was the one where the beginner’s lesson was on Web Browsing, so I went to GeeksOnTour.com/weeklyshow where all the shows are listed with a description and I did a CTRL-F (on a computer) for “brows.”  I didn’t know if the description mentioned “Browser” or “Browsing” or “Browse” but I was sure that “brows” would be found. This led me to episode #28 from 1/25/15. At this point, anyone can watch the Youtube recording of the show without being a member, but only members have access to the Show Notes. I opened the Show Notes for episode 28 and skimmed until I got to the section on “Web Browsing on Android” … here is a screenshot of that section:

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Notice the numbers in red. Those are direct timeline links to the places in the Youtube video where that particular topic is discussed. So, if you want to watch the video, you don’t have to watch the entire 45 minute show to get what you need.

In my case, I didn’t even have to review the video because the info I was looking for was written out in the notes: “To search within a page: View the page, tap the 3-dot menu … Find in Page…” YES! That’s what I was looking for, and it worked great.

Now if only I could improve my memory!

Three Ways to Get Internet Overseas

SIM cards are readily available in England

Internet access while traveling has been a primary topic of ours for many years. But we’ve only traveled in the US. Now we’re on a trip visiting friends in England and we’re taking the opportunity to learn about Global Internet access.

Three Ways to Get Internet Overseas

  1. Use local Wi-Fi hotspots. Turn off the phone’s mobile data, or turn on Airplane mode.
  2. Use your cell provider in Roaming mode. Depending on your provider, this can be very expensive (Verizon) or included at no extra charge like with T-Mobile.
  3. Buy a SIM card from a local provider and put it in your phone.

Cellular Voice and Data Service while in England

When I turned on my Verizon phone after landing in London, I got the message: Allow Data on this trip? If I said Yes, there would be “substantial” charges. Or, they gave a number to call to arrange for a global plan. A global plan from Verizon would have cost us $25/100 MB. Since we can use 100MB in less than an hour that was not the plan for us!

Jim’s iPhone on T-Mobile rang while we were walking through a field near Cambridge. It was someone from Virginia who had dialed his normal, Florida-based phone number. They chatted for a while and took care of business, without even knowing where we were.

Jim’s Nexus 6 appears to be his phone of choice. This was the device he used for Google Maps to navigate from Cambridge to Methwold, and from Bexhill to Belgium. While I was feeling quite out of sorts not being able to access any internet resources on my Samsung, not even a local map.

Wi-Fi Access

While at our friends’ house, we were able to use their Wi-Fi. For the couple of nights we stayed in a hotel, there was good, free, Wi-Fi available, and several of the pubs and restaurants we visited also had free Wi-Fi. But, this didn’t help when we were in a car or on a boat.

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SIM Cards

A SIM card is the “Subscriber Identity Module,” a tiny card that establishes the connection between your phone and the cellular service provider. Once it is installed your phone has a new phone number and data service. In England, you can buy SIM cards at the checkout line in the grocery stores! The card only costs $1.50, then you install it and call the cell company to add $30 worth of service for 2-4 GB of data for the month. Here is our member video on installing a SIM card:

When we returned home, we presented our weekly show, What Does This Button Do? using Internet Connections Abroad as our focus. Here’s the show: